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Led Zeppelin Print In Through The Out Door Signed Aubrey Powell

Artist

Storm Thorgerson

More prints from
Storm Thorgerson

Album Cover Fine Art Limited Edition Memorabila Art Poster
Led Zeppelin Print In Through The Out Door Signed Aubrey Powell

Date: 2001

Signed By: Aubrey Powell In Pencil

Edition: 500 World Wide

Dimensions: Print size 26" x 33". Image size 19.5" x 19.5"

Atelier: Coriander Studios, London

Condition: New - mint condition

Medium: 330g Somerset Satin Enhanced

British Pounds£720
US Dollars$958
Euros€888
Japanese Yen¥123588

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Customer Reviews

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Led Zeppelin In Through The Out Door
Reviewed by Gary Renowden from Birmingham

Purchased 2005.

In this print a scene is set. A lonely man in a bar burning a dear john letter, a non-specific past.

This album cover is cleverly designed as it makes you wonder about each of the characters in the scene and what, if anything they are thinking.

Exactly like a lick of fresh paint across a faded surface, a new look to an old scene.

For the serious collector it is a real MUST HAVE print, buy it now before they all go!

November 2009

Date: 2001

Signed By: Aubrey Powell In Pencil

Edition: 500 World Wide

Dimensions: Print size 26" x 33". Image size 19.5" x 19.5"

Atelier: Coriander Studios, London

Condition: New - mint condition

Medium: 330g Somerset Satin Enhanced


In Through the Out Door is the eighth studio album by English rock band Led Zeppelin and the last recorded before John Bonham died and the group disbanded in 1980. It was recorded over a three week period in November and December 1978 at ABBA's Polar Studios in Stockholm, Sweden, and released by Swan Song Records on 15 August 1979. In Through the Out Door was the band's sixth and final release to reach the top of the charts in America.
he original album featured an unusual gimmick: the album had an outer sleeve which was made to look like a plain brown paper bag, and the inner sleeve featured black and white line artwork which, if washed with a wet brush, would become permanently fully colored. There were also six different sleeves featuring a different pair of photos (one on each side; see images at right), and the external brown paper sleeve meant that it was impossible for record buyers to tell which sleeve they were getting. (There is actually a code on the spine of the album jacket, which indicated which sleeve it wasthis could sometimes be seen while the record was still sealed.) The pictures all depicted the same scene in a bar (in which a man burns a Dear John letter), and each photo was taken from the separate point of view of someone who appeared in the other photos.

The album artwork was designed by Hipgnosis. Storm Thorgerson recalls the design in his book Eye of the Storm:

The sepia quality was meant to evoke a non-specific past and to allow the brushstroke across the middle to be better rendered in colour and so make a contrast. This self same brushstroke was like the swish of a wiper across a wet windscreen, like a lick of fresh paint across a faded surface, a new look to an old scene, which was what Led Zeppelin told us about their album. A lick of fresh paint, as per Led Zeppelin, and the music on this album... It somehow grew in proportion and became six viewpoints of the same man in the bar, seen by the six other characters. Six different versions of the same image and six different covers.
In 1980, Hipgnosis was nominated for a Grammy Award in the category of best album package for In Through the Out Door.